When I ask Ellie Bamber for the names of some of the actresses she admired growing up, her answer unintentionally provokes a giggle. “Definitely Nicole Kidman,” she starts. “Moulin Rouge was one of those films that I watched as a kid and was like ‘Oh my god, that’s what I want to do.’ And I love Emma Stone, I think she’s a really amazing actress.” I pause, waiting for the moment of recognition, then laughing, point out the common theme of red hair, shared also by Ellie. All at once, she’s surprised and apologetic, almost as if it didn’t occur to her. “That’s so weird, sorry!” She nervously laughs. “When I was a kid, I was blonde. I’m naturally blonde. It’s weird how as a kid I was already gravitating towards that – that’s funny actually.”

Real or not, Ellie Bamber is a redhead rising through the ranks, her signature strawberry-blonde hair a striking point of difference from many of her peers. It’s this hair that would have played at least a small part in snagging her career-making role in Tom Ford’s haunting 2016 thriller Nocturnal Animals, where she joined a flame-haired acting trifecta completed by Amy Adams and Isla Fisher. After a disturbing, but powerful performance as a daughter on a doomed family road trip, it sparked excited murmurs surrounding the Berkshire-born newcomer. But hair is just one thing. Talent is another.

And talent is something that Ellie has in buckets. She’s been lauded as somewhat of an industry chameleon, seamlessly embodying all manner of roles. Pre-Nocturnal Animals, there was Pride and Prejudice and Zombies, a comic, feminist, gore-filled riff on the Jane Austen classic which saw her train for two months in martial arts. Last year, she made her much-celebrated Donmar Theatre debut for a modern adaptation of the famous Henrik Ibsen play, The Lady from the Sea. In 2017, after the visuals for Shawn Mendes’ hit “There’s Nothing Holdin’ Me Back” were released, fans went into a frenzy investigating the identity of his music video love interest – played convincingly by Bamber, a free-spirit in the early raptures of love.

A stint as Tom Ford’s muse means that her style – which she describes as “a combination of classic, pretty things, and street style” – has also snagged her opportunities such as being appointed as a Chanel ambassador. Casual. She’s also the lead in upcoming project, Taipei (High Resolution), a love-in-the-age-of-social-media tale, about “a couple who takes loads of drugs together, film themselves and put it out on the internet.” Currently, she’s speaking to me over the phone from Brazil, where she’s shooting a harrowing abduction true story, The Seven Sorrows of Mary, which she calls a “tough” but also “really important piece of work.”
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Ellie Bamber and High Resolution were awarded at the Orlando Film Festival. The news was announced on the official twitter of the film.

Ellie won in the category ‘Best Actress‘ and High Resolution in the category ‘Best Cinematography‘.

High Resolution is streaming On Demand on Showtime and you can also watch it on November 9th on Showtime’s premium channel, XTRA.

Congratulations to the winners!

The Mexico International Film Festival and Awards has become an important awards event within the film industry and a centerpiece for promoting and growing the thriving arts and culture community of Mexico. Founded on the premise that the language of film is universal and a dynamic force in bridging cultural understanding, the event celebrates and recognizes the very best of international independent cinema from around the world.

Held annually each May, the Mexico International Film Festival and Awards is an extraordinary celebration of cinematic discovery and innovation. Each year we honor the best from around the world in various competition categories including Feature Films, Documentaries, Short Films, Foreign Films, Mexican Films, a short and feature length Screenplay Competition, Music Videos, Experimental Films, Television Pilots, Environmental Films, and more. In addition, Special Jury Prizes are awarded to several standout films and screenplays at the discretion of the Official Jury.

2018 Bronze Palm Award Winners:

Narrative Feature Competition

The Blizzard directed by Jiang Kaiyang
The Suicide (Subtitled) directed by Pedro Pablo De Antuñano Padilla
Tejano directed by David Blue Garcia
Somewhere In Tonga directed by Florian Schewe
Taipei directed by Jason Lester
Desert Shores directed by Michael Stevantoni
A Part Of Me directed by Silvana Santamaria & Bilal Athimni
En Algun Lugar directed by Tadeo Garcia
The Dmz directed by Inchun Oh
Venus Obscura directed by Christophe Karabache

Full list of winners.

Taipei is an adaptation of Tao Lin’s critically-acclaimed, cult favorite novel of the same name. Two young New York writers fall in and out of love amidst a whirlwind of drugs, parties, technology, and travel. As one relationship collapses, another blooms for Erin (Ellie Bamber), swept into the world of Paul Chen (Justin Chon), a mysterious, charismatic author. When he proposes documenting every aspect of their new romance in an epic laptop-filmed “documentary”, the couple enter into a performative bad romance, fueled by substances and sleepless nights. Tracking the pair through a shotgun Niagara Falls wedding, an LSD trip in a New Jersey mansion, and to Taiwan, the country of Paul’s birth where the couple comes to confront their individual alienation, Taipei is a visually stunning, extremely contemporary portrayal of what it means to be young, alive, and in love in a digital world.

Ellie Bamber won the Ian Charleson Award for 2017, which honors actors under 30 in a classic role.

Bamber won the third prize for her performance as Hilde in The Lady from the Sea, at the Donmar Warehouse in London.

They are given in memory of actor Charleson, who died in 1991, with the first prize winner receiving £ 5,000, second prize receiving £ 2,000, and third prize £ 500.

The shortlist also included Daniel Ezra, Sope Dirisu, Hannah Morrish, Rebecca Lee, James Corrigan, Arthur Hughes and Douggie McMeekin.

The awards were presented at a ceremony at the National Theatre.

– 1st prize, Natalie Simpson, The Cardinal
– 2nd prize, Tamara Lawrance, Twelfth Night
– 3rd prize, Ellie Bamber, The Lady from the Sea Donmar Warehouse

Great news! The nominees for the 2017 Ian Charleson Awards have been announced. The awards are for actors under 30 in a classical role (in a play written before 1918), in memory of the Scottish actor, who died at 40 in 1990, shortly after taking over the role of Hamlet at the National, despite his ill health. The awards ceremony will take place at the National Theatre, London SE1, on May 18.

Ellie Bamber for Hilde in Ibsen’s The Lady from the Sea
Donmar Warehouse, dir Kwame Kwei-Armah